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Bolt’s coach calls for national anti-doping lab

Jun 17, 2013, 10:38 AM EST

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Following the recent failed drug test and impeding suspension of Jamaican Olympic champ Veronica Campbell-Brown, Usain Bolt’s coach Glen Mills said it was time for the government to create an accredited anti-doping lab to “ensure the purity of substances” the athletes are using for training.

“It just re-emphasizes the need for all involved to be extremely vigilant and the great need for Jamaica to establish an accredited lab so that athletes can have substances tested and verified before usage,” Mills told RJR 94FM radio in Jamaica. “It’s a minefield out there. Any substance that you take up could be contaminated.”

Mills, who also coaches 2011 world 100m champ and London silver medealist Yohan Blake, is concerned that athlete’s careers could be derailed if they can’t test substances for training. Jamaican samples are currently processed in other countries, including at WADA headquarters in Montreal.

Campbell-Brown, 31, tested positive for a banned diuretic that’s known for its use as a masking agent for performance enhancing drugs. She’s facing a two year ban from the IAAF, but wont know until next week.

The three-time gold medalist is one of a dozen Jamaican athletes who’ve faced suspensions of three months or more during the last five years, a span that’s seen Jamaica dominate track and field at the Olympics, with 23 medals won between London and Beijing. Jamaican 400m runner Dominique Blake was suspended six years on Thursday for failing a drug test in the lead up to the London Games.

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